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Baby overdue? A survival guide

The last month of pregnancy is the slowest since time began, it is well documented that it has 74 days. If your baby is too comfortable in the fluid filled home you have created for them, this can stretch to an extra 14 days.  Nobody ever thinks this will happen to them. You focus on the due date as if it is a target you will be lucky to reach, never considering that you might still be lumbering around awkwardly for a further two weeks.

Neither of my babies got the hint that it was time to vacate the premises and both of them had to be evicted!

I was born prematurely myself so having some notion that my first baby would definitely arrive early, I finished up in work four weeks before my due date. And was still pregnant six weeks later. I was climbing the walls (if climbing the walls looks like sitting on a yoga ball, crying and eating crisps). On my second I was more appreciative of the time at home….

I read an inordinate amount of articles on-line about how to induce labour. I was doing all I could to help nature along, but I was suffering with SPD and on crutches so wasn’t too mobile. I had two scheduled inductions at almost two weeks overdue with both babies. Having labour induced is no walk in the park but having been through it twice I have some practical advice.

 This isn’t a list of spicy curries, labour inducing cupcakes or aromatherapy oils, but a more realistic survival guide.

  1. As you will more than likely have gone past your due date, you will be tormented by well-meaning nosey bodies texting and calling non-stop looking for baby news. Buy yourself a large toblerone and every time a text reading something like “any sign of that baby?” pings into your phone, eat a triangle. Sure, you will go through that bad boy in record time but it’s not like you have much else to do.
  2. It can be fun to respond to those “any sign of the baby” questions with “oh god, did we forgot to tell you! It was a …” or have some stock newborn photos to reply with.
  3. Forget the batch cooking enthusiasts who would have you cook and freeze enough meals to sit out a zombie apocalypse and instead find yourself a bubblegum TV series to distract you. Dance moms was my particular poison.
  4. If you are being induced, I would really, really recommend keeping the date from as many people as you can. Being in labour is rough enough without your auntie Jean seeking a dilation update.
  5. Don’t expect to have your baby the same day you are induced. My daughter was two days old when I bumped into another mother who was induced at the same time as me, her baby was only a couple of hours old.
  6. On a practical level, some info on being induced: In most cases, the first thing tried is a gel. Which is basically inserted like a tampon. This may or may not get things going, and may or may not need to be repeated.
  7. Another route is the drip with Syntocinon, I needed this second time round when the gel didn’t work the same magic as the first time. Some people might go straight to the drip, policies differ everywhere. I’m told the contractions from the Syntocinon are three times stronger than natural contractions. Be prepared.
  8. You may end up with a c-section, the chances are higher when induced than going yourself. Just something to have in the back of your mind.
  9. I liked the assurance of being induced, of being in hospital with professionals around me monitoring me at all stages. There was no second guessing of “is it time to go to the hospital yet?” or being sent home because you weren’t far enough along.

If you don’t fancy getting to the point where any of the above apply to you, the word on the street suggests dusting down your apron to bake some lemon drop labour cookies to scoff after a vindaloo dinner before a night of passion…

This post first appeared on the wonderful M Word